Wilden® Donates New AODD Pump To Mercy Ships

Pump used on world’s largest civilian hospital ship

Grand Terrace, CA – January 8, 2018Wilden®, part of PSG®, a Dover company and a worldwide leader in air-operated double-diaphragm (AODD) pump technology, is pleased to announce that it recently donated a new AODD pump to Mercy Ships for transferring blackwater onboard the hospital ship Africa Mercy, the largest civilian hospital ship in the world. Founded in 1978, Mercy Ships is a global charitable organization that operates a fleet of hospital ships specially designed for use in developing nations.

Many people in Africa have little or no access to healthcare. As a result, many children, teens and adults suffer and die every day from curable or treatable causes. For nearly 40 years, Mercy Ships has delivered free services valued at more than $1 billion – directly impacting more than 2.5 million children and families. As a state-of-the-art hospital ship, the Africa Mercy brings volunteer medical teams and sterile operating rooms directly to people who would otherwise go without care.

“At Wilden, we are passionately committed to making a difference in people’s lives,” said Erik Solfelt, Diaphragm Pump Product Manager for Wilden. “We’re thrilled to participate in important programs, such as Mercy Ships, and are extremely happy that our pumps have the ability to help improve the health of those in need. We look forward to continuing to help Mercy Ships for many years to come.”

Specifically, Wilden donated a PS8 Original™ 51 mm (2”) metal AODD pump to Mercy Ships. This high performance pump features the reliability and energy savings of the Pro-Flo SHIFT® Air Distribution System (ADS) while its clamped configuration allows for easier maintenance, diaphragm replacement and cleaning. PS8 Original pumps are shear sensitive and intrinsically safe with self-priming and dry-run capabilities, and offer the longest mean time between repair (MTBR), superior anti-freezing and increased on/off reliability.

Wilden Mercy Ships

@Mercy Ships, credit: Shawn Thompson

To learn more about Mercy Ships, please visit mercyships.org, and click here to watch the story of one family that has been impacted by the organization.

For more information about Wilden, please visit wildenpump.com. Wilden is a product brand within PSG, a Dover company. For more information on PSG, please visit psgdover.com.

About Wilden Pump and Engineering:
Jim Wilden revolutionized the pumping industry when he invented the air-operated double-diaphragm (AODD) pump in 1955. Since then, Wilden AODD pumps have proven to be trustworthy solutions to pumping applications in a wide variety of industries. Wilden pumps are part of PSG®, a Dover company, and manufactured in Grand Terrace, CA.

Marketing Contact:
Christine Anderson, Marketing Communications Manager
PSG®
909-422-1774 or Christine.Anderson@psgdover.com

Media Contact:
Darren Wight, VP Media & Publicity
DeanHouston (agency for PSG®)
513-280-0047 or dwight@deanhouston.com

About Mercy Ships:
Mercy Ships uses hospital ships to deliver free, world-class healthcare services, capacity building and sustainable development to those with little access in the developing world. Founded in 1978 by Don and Deyon Stephens, Mercy Ships has worked in more than 70 countries providing services valued at more than $1.3 billion, treating more than 2.56 million direct beneficiaries. The Africa Mercy is crewed by 400 volunteers from up to 40 nations, an average of 1000 each year. Professionals including surgeons, dentists, nurses, healthcare trainers, teachers, cooks, seamen, engineers, and agriculturalists donate their time and skills to the effort. With offices in 16 nations, Mercy Ships seeks to transform individuals and serve nations one at a time. For more information click on www.mercyships.org.

For more information about Mercy Ships, please contact:

For USA: Pauline Rick

US Public Relations Coordinator
Mercy Ships
Office Tel: (903) 939-7000
Mob: (972) 922-5442
Email: us.media@mercyships.org

For Int’l: Diane Rickard
International Media Manager
Mercy Ships
Diane.rickard@mercyships.org

Hi-res photos and general Mercy Ships B-Roll video footage are available upon request.


Go with the flow

Source: ProFood World

A pump upgrade helps a winery irrigate its fruit caps while providing gentle product handling, enhanced efficiency and labor savings.

When Rodney Strong Vineyards built its new 10,500-square-foot fermentation facility in Healdsburg, California, the family-owned winery sought out highly specialized equipment that could optimize operations and product handling. That included finding a pump that could adeptly irrigate the fruit caps, which are the solid mass of grape skins, stems and seeds that float to the top of the fermentation tanks, and prevent them from hardening. After exhaustive research and testing, Rodney Strong Vineyards installed air-operated double-diaphragm (AODD) pump technology that provides energy efficiency, reduced maintenance, cleanability, reliability and gentle product handling for optimum fermentation of its luxury wines.

Wilden_RodneyStrong_2

Founded in 1959 by former ballet dancer Rodney Strong, the award-winning winery helped put Sonoma County on the map for world-class winemaking. It helped transform the area’s reputation as farmland where apples and prunes were the leading crops into one of the finest wine regions in the country. Strong was an early innovator in the industry, making wines from a single vineyard rather than blending grapes.

Today, Rodney Strong produces about 830,000 cases of wine annually. The winery focuses on cabernet sauvignon, chardonnay, merlot and zinfandel. To keep up with growing production and to enhance product quality, Rodney Strong recently built a state-of-the-art cellar with 51 stainless-steel, 6,000-gallon fermentation tanks. One of the critical components of the tanks is the AODD pump used to irrigate the fruit cap during fermentation.

The wine producer installed Wilden Saniflo FDA pumps with the Pro-Flo SHIFT Air Distribution System (ADS) to prevent the fruit caps formed at the top of the tank from hardening. Known as “pumping over,” the operation requires the pump to draw juice from just above the seed layer near the bottom of the fermentation tank and pump it to the top of the tank. The juice is sent through a flinger device and an oxygen-inducing nozzle that spread the juice to completely cover the cap and keep it wet. Juice is pumped for 20-minute periods up to three times per day.

Like many wineries, Rodney Strong originally used centrifugal pumps to irrigate the fruit caps. However, the centrifugal pumps tended to grind and break up grape seeds that are sucked in by the pump and become part of the flow. The ground seeds introduced a high quantity of tannins into the wine, which adversely affected product quality. This drawback prompted the winery to find a pump alternative that would reduce or even eliminate grinding the seeds.

“We had strict requirements that the pump provide gentle product handling, energy efficiency, ease of cleaning and operational reliability,” says Manuel Villanueva, cellar master for Rodney Strong.

Passing the test

The winery worked with Pumping Solutions, Inc., a pump and process equipment supplier that has a long history of working with the wine industry, to determine the best pump for the vineyard’s requirements. After testing various AODD, centrifugal and progressive-cavity pumps, Rodney Strong decided to use an AODD pump, which offered shear sensitivity and gentle product handling that circulates the liquid during the pumping-over process without damaging the juice. In addition, an AODD pump maintains the air pressure and required flow consistently.

“The AODD pump was clearly the best in helping to extract the juices as well as control the desired tannins and color from each grape varietal that we put in,” Villanueva says.

Rodney Strong then conducted a battery of tests to evaluate AODD pumps from various manufacturers. In addition to reviewing performance, quality, energy efficiency and ease of maintenance, the company was particularly interested in pump-air consumption. “We were utilizing a smaller air compressor, so our goal was to find an energy-efficient pump that could be driven by our current equipment,” says Justin Seidenfeld, a winemaker at Rodney Strong.

“Our tests showed that the Wilden pumps with the Pro-Flo SHIFT ADS require less air consumption to provide the same liquid flow as pumps from other manufacturers, giving us much greater efficiency and energy savings,” Villanueva says.

The patent-pending Wilden Pro-Flo SHIFT ADS reduces air consumption by incorporating a unique air control spool that automatically restricts the amount of air going into the pump during the latter part of each stroke. This eliminates overfilling the air chamber and results in reduced energy consumption. By optimizing air consumption, the Pro-Flo lowers energy and operating costs, achieving up to 60 percent savings over other AODD pumps, according to Villanueva.

Cleaning up

Beyond the energy and cost savings, Rodney Strong says the pumps offer cleaning advantages. “In addition to meeting FDA standards, cleanability was a very important factor to consider in our evaluation process for efficiency and labor savings,” Villanueva says. “In comparing designs, we found that the Wilden Saniflo FDA pumps provided superior cleanability. They utilize tri-clamps for extremely quick disassembly and assembly to save labor in the sanitization process. In addition, the overall pump design makes cleaning easy. We know that good sanitization processes help assure you produce a good wine, and that’s part of maintaining our high quality.”

To further enhance sanitation, Rodney Strong installed the Wilden Full-Stroke Integral Piston Diaphragm. Santoprene encapsulates the outer piston, eliminating cracks and crevices where bacteria can hide.

“The Wilden one-piece diaphragm makes it significantly easier for the pump to be cleaned at the end of the season when we’re done with our cap management,” Seidenfeld explains.

Rodney Strong also discovered that the Full-Stroke Integral Piston Diaphragm is more efficient than conventional diaphragms. The full-stroke design provides increased displacement per stroke, resulting in higher productivity for enhanced flow rates and 115 percent greater suction lift. This operational efficiency allows for fewer strokes for the same performance, which reduces energy consumption and extends diaphragm life.

Since installing 16 Wilden pumps in its tanks, Rodney Strong has been pleased with how the pumps have helped the winery enhance its energy efficiency, reduce labor costs and improve product quality. The winery has ordered an additional 43 pumps for its cellar.


Building Applications Knowledge Can Unlock Value in Pump Selection

Source: Chemical Products Finder

Leveraging this expertise solves customer problems and creates a sustainable competitive advantage

In industrial business-to-business equipment markets, manufacturers are faced with an increasingly difficult operating environment.

Energy-price volatility, the increasing costs of regulatory compliance and public demands for improved environmental stewardship in regards to scarce resources are three prominent factors that are now impacting industrial organizations in the United States and around the world.

In confronting these challenges, manufacturers have to adapt in numerous ways, including investing in next-generation technologies. For example, industrial producers, such as paint and resin manufacturers or oil-and-gas refinery operators, are investing in advanced technologies that will help them achieve their business goals. Smart SCADA systems can reduce downtime though proactive monitoring, and energy-efficient pump technology delivers operating cost savings, hedges against energy-price fluctuations and helps companies meet their environmental stewardship goals by reducing carbon emissions.

However, the adoption of any new technology can dramatically increase the complexity of business operations at a time when cost pressures and economic headwinds threaten to curtail growth and profitability. Further, these technology investments require knowledge and expertise – specialized knowledge and expertise – to build, operate and maintain. Many industrial producers, like most businesses, face resource constraints and are operating with leaner staffing levels than ever before. As a result, they are finding they do not possess the in-house expertise to effectively select, build, operate and maintain increasingly complex equipment and systems, and often are forced to turn to third-party organizations with specialized expertise for support.

Pump manufacturers in particular, along with their related distributors, engineering firms, consultants and other third parties, are increasingly stepping up to supply this critical applications expertise to their end-user customers. This white paper will illustrate how properly deployed applications expertise can unlock value for industrial producers and makes the case that organizations that build superior applications expertise in their markets can gain a significant competitive advantage.

The Challenge

Industrial manufacturers are facing an increasingly difficult business environment, one that is often impacted by these and other critical factors:

  • Energy-Price Volatility
  • Regulatory Compliance Legislation and Associated Costs
  • Public/Customer Expectations for Enhanced Resource Stewardship

Let us take a closer look at all three.

Energy-Price Volatility

Price volatility is defined in the energy industry as how quickly or widely electricity and/or natural gas prices change over a given time period. Prices are governed by supply and demand, where demand is impacted by factors such as weather patterns, economic conditions and consumer behaviour. In recent years, price volatility has increased in the energy market. To protect against this volatility, many companies “hedge,” or buy a commodity at a price that is locked in over a set period of time. While this may improve peace of mind for the operator, hedging is costly and does not create value for the operator beyond reducing energy-cost volatility.

wilden

Wilden Original™ Series Air-Operated Double-Diaphragm (AODD) pumps in operation at a ceramic plant in Spain

The severity, and potential impact, of price volatility is such that in its 2015 report titled, “The New Normal,” the World Energy Council (WEC) opined that, “The uncertain impact of volatile energy and commodity prices…has now established itself as the number-one issue for energy leaders worldwide.”

The good news is that global energy leaders have recognized this challenge and are beginning to take measures to address it. According to Francois Moisan in WEC’s triennial 2016 report, “Energy Efficiency: A Straight Path Towards Energy Sustainability,” “The introduction of energy-efficiency policies and measures has been growing fast around the world. The increasing number of countries with an energy-efficiency law…signifies a strengthening and consolidation of the industrial commitment to energy efficiency.”

The report does also indicate, however, that “despite the significant advances, much more can and should be done to improve the efficiency of energy production and use.” This is extremely noteworthy for industrial manufacturers because, as the WEC also notes, “industrial electric motors and electric motor-driven systems consume almost half of the total electricity and account for 70 per cent of the total (amount of) electricity consumed in industry.”

For many industrial companies, where energy is a significant portion of operating costs, price volatility will continue to be a challenge. These companies will be self-served to evaluate energy-saving technology, but will only reap the greatest rewards if they do so by taking into account the intricacies of their equipment in the specific applications in which they operate. Only by developing and using the proper applications expertise will they be able to identify and choose the technology that is best suited to mitigate the cost risks associated with energy volatility.

wilden

A stainless-steel Wilden Advanced™ PX Series AODD pump in use at the SABA B.V. glue- and adhesive-manufacturing facility in The Netherlands.

Regulatory Compliance

Regulatory compliance is by definition a necessity for businesses in the modern world. These laws collectively shape the environment in which businesses operate. While addressing the effectiveness of regulations is outside the scope of this paper, from a cost perspective, the number of federal regulations in the US has been growing steadily for several decades, requiring investments by many businesses in order to maintain compliance. In fact, a study by George Mason University shows that “the effects of federal regulation on value added to the (US) GDP for a panel of 22 industries…over a period of 35 years…dampened (GDP by approximately) 0.8 per cent per year since 1980, eliminating $4 trillion in growth by 2012.”

Two prominent examples in the industrial-manufacturing universe are the motor-efficiency regulations that have been developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) in Europe. The bottom line is that the evolving design and operation of motors presents a specific example of how next-generation technology can help manufacturers lower their energy usage, meet environmental-responsibility thresholds and reduce operating costs.

wilden

Mouvex SLS Series Eccentric Disc pump being utilized for the transfer of carbonated-beverage bases by the Coca-Cola Hellenic Bottling Company in Dunaharaszti, Hungary.

To address the operation of motors and how best to improve it, the International Energy Agency (IEA) created the Energy Efficiency End-Use Equipment (4E) working group, which consists of representatives from 12 countries: Australia, Austria, Canada, Denmark, France, Japan, Korea, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the US.

In late 2015, the 4E group released a study, “Energy Efficiency Roadmap for Electric Motors and Motor Systems,” that indicated that since 1995, “efficient motors have gained an increasing share of the global market, assisted by a framework of international standards that classifies motors according to their energy efficiency.”

Motors were placed in one of four classifications – E0 (least efficient), E1, E2 and E3 (most efficient) – which created a common technical platform that underpins national policies that are targeted at increasing the implementation of high-efficiency motors in manufacturing operations. The four classifications form the basis of minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) that are now inherent to most advanced economies, as well as to many developing nations. The findings show that the global sales of motors that fall into the two most-efficient classifications – E2 and E3 – accounted for roughly 70 percent of all motor sales in 2015, after standing at less than 10 per cent of market share in 1995.

This is significant because the IEA expects that the market for motors is expected to expand by 2.5 per cent annually through 2019, which will create opportunities for the further introduction of higher-efficiency motors into both mature and developing countries and markets. However, as the IEA notes, the impact of more efficient motors on overall market efficiency is gradual due to the motor’s extended operational lifetime. To speed up the increase in overall efficiency, several countries are considering regulations that will enforce MEPS by encouraging the early retirement of inefficient motors.


A View from the Field

For more than 100 years, Houston, TX-based DXP Enterprises, Inc, which began life as the Southern Engine and Pump Company back in 1908, has served its customers by focusing on product expertise, technical service, and maintenance, repair, operating and production (MROP) supply-chain management. Skip Giessing, President of DXP Enterprises’ Rotating Equipment Division, provided his views on how application expertise can be used as the foundation for selecting the proper pumping technology and systems.

Question: How would you define applications expertise, in your own words?

Answer: Applications expertise is the ability to properly choose, size and configure the right product for any specific customer application. This means taking into consideration customer specifications and requirements, customer preferences, pump performance, energy consumption, reliability, ease of installation and cost.

Q: To what extent does your company amass and utilize expert knowledge in order to service your customers?

A: DXP does this in three ways. First, we have experts that are centralized inside our sales staff at our headquarters in Houston who are available to assist any DXP branch location. This inside sales team is divided up into three different levels of expertise: basic, medium and high specification. Second, we have applications experts located locally at many of our larger branch locations. Third, we have a 24/7/365 Customer First Center located in Houston that can be accessed by any customer, anywhere in the world, at any time for assistance. All of these applications experts receive continuous training and from time to time accompany outside sales personnel on sales calls in order to make sure they understand their customers’ needs completely.

Q: In what specific ways does this knowledge help create value (cost avoidance, failure avoidance, increased revenue, etc) for your customers?

A: Customer-spend reduction and maximum reliability have become more important for the sophisticated customer. Revenue is a function of uptime, so unscheduled downtimes cannot be tolerated. Customers also seek to optimize the suitability of their equipment and reduce energy consumption as much as possible. Maintenance and operations budgets are also receiving much more scrutiny and solution providers like DXP are relied upon to continuously work with their customers to help reduce these costs. Finally, capital-spending specifications have become more detailed in terms of performance optimization and reliability, as well.

Q: With regard to applications expertise, how do you see the relationship between PSG (the manufacturer) and your company (the distributor) helping to best deliver value to the end user (your customer)?

A: It starts with ample communication. Applications experts can help PSG make improvements to their products, ensuring that PSG stays in step with customer requirements. For example, this can take the form of product design and construction improvements, such as materials of construction and component redesign or upgrade, or the design of additional sizes or models that better satisfy customer needs. Applications experts are as much the Voice of the Customer as are the outside salespersons, repair and service experts, and the customer itself.

Q: To what extent does your company’s pumping-system knowledge contribute to your firm’s success in the market? What role does applications expertise play in your competitive advantage?

A: Customers are relying more and more on their key suppliers to help them meet their corporate goals and objectives. DXP relies on applications expertise as a key competitive differentiation. The experience and knowledge of expert application engineers, teamed up with outside sales engineers who also have applications expertise and a closer, more personal feel for customers’ imperatives, motivations and preferences, ensures that DXP will always provide the customer with a tailored solution that is the best for his needs. Having this capability available 24/7/365 is another key differentiator.


Expectations for Resource Stewardship

A phrase that has gained in stature over the past two decades in all forms of business is “corporate social responsibility,” or CSR, which is commonly characterized as “business practices involving initiatives that benefit society.” An article in the June 18, 2016, issue of the International Journal of Business and Management titled, “Corporate Social Responsibility and Consumer Buying Behaviour in Emerging Markets,” highlighted that “consumers now want companies to behave ethically in addition to providing quality product(s)...”

The obvious implication is that those companies that are perceived to be inattentive or irresponsible stewards regarding shared resources (eg, community water supplies) risk a political and social backlash that could impact the company’s standing and ability to do business in the communities in which it operates.

Therefore, it should not be surprising that a report from Harvard Business School titled, “The Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility on Investment Recommendations,” revealed that “recent research shows spending money on corporate social responsibility is no longer seen as a detriment to a company’s profitability. Stock analysts now view such expenditures as essential to a company’s long-term brand and value.”

In short, to improve their CSR standing, more and more companies are investing additional time and resources toward incorporating new technologies, changing operating practices and even adjusting business strategies in order to better assuage the corporate-responsibility demands of the buying public. Indeed, these resources can only be optimized by developing and applying expert knowledge of the business, its systems and the local environment in which it operates. Businesses that develop and use this knowledge will help satisfy the needs of the public while achieving positive outcomes in resource stewardship.


Determining Pump Life-Cycle Costs

According to the Hydraulic Institute manual titled, “Pump Life Cycle Costs: A Guide to LCC Analysis for Pumping Systems,” LCC analysis takes into consideration the cost of purchasing, installing, operating, maintaining and disposing of all of the system’s components during their operational lifetime. To this end the Hydraulic Institute has created an equation that identifies and quantifies all parts of a pumping system’s total LCC:

LCC = Cic + Cin + Ce + Co + Cm + Cs + Cenv + Cd

where:

C = a cost element, and
ic = initial cost or purchase price (eg, of the pump, system, piping, auxiliary equipment, etc)
in = installation and commission
e = energy costs
o = operating costs (the labour costs for normal system supervision)
m = maintenance costs (eg, parts, worker hours, etc)
s = downtime (loss of production)
env = environmental costs
d = decommissioning

These costs should also include the costs associated with any applicable loans, depreciation and taxes.

When used as a tool for comparing alternative solutions, the LCC process will indicate the most cost-effective one within the limits of available data. When applying the evaluation process or selecting pumps and other equipment, the best information concerning the output and operation of the plant must be obtained if a true picture of the total LCC is to be achieved. Using bad, incomplete or imprecise information will result in an incorrect assessment, which will be of limited benefit to the operator. While the LCC process will not guarantee a particular result, it does allow plant personnel to make a reasonable comparison between several unique alternatives.


The Solution

So how do industrial manufacturers address the challenges of price volatility, regulatory compliance and resource stewardship, and still successfully achieve their business goals? Many companies are turning to technology for assistance.

In a February 2013 article titled, “The Dawn of the Smart Factory,” IndustryWeek magazine detailed a looming manufacturing nirvana known as the “Smart Factory.” This factory of the future will be “a paradise of efficiency where defect and downtime, waste and waiting are long-forgotten issues of a long-forgotten age.” The driving force behind this phenomenon would be plant managers and chief intelligence officers who work together to create a seamless blend of data and production that will “illuminate every turn of every machine, every cut of every blade, every move of every piece in its global dance to deliver.”

While the hyperbole in this article is heavy, the article’s basic premise was echoed in a 2015 study by MarketsandMarkets, a publisher of premium market-research reports. In its piece titled, “Smart Factory Market by Technology, Component, Industry and Geography – Global Forecast to 2022,” MarketsandMarkets researchers found that the smart-factory market, in terms of value, is expected to reach $74.8 billion by 2022, with a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 10.4 per cent between 2016 and 2022.

“The emergence of smart factories can be seen from the period of change toward cohesive control of the machineries, processes and resources with local intelligence,” read the report. “The increasing focus on saving energy and improving process efficiency, along with the integration of engineering and manufacturing by the adoption of IoT (the ‘Internet of Things’) is expected to foster the growth of the smart-factory market.”

While the smart-factory operating principles promise to be a boon for industrial manufacturers who implement them, they will raise the complexity of the operation, which poses its own set of unique challenges. In fact, according to strategic-management consulting firm A T Kearney’s “How Much Does Complexity Really Cost?” survey of the top 30 companies in Germany, a reduction in operational complexity would boost earnings by more than €30 billion

(US $ 34.9 billion) and increase earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT) by 3 per cent to 5 per cent.

The ultimate challenge for a manufacturer is to learn how new technologies can improve his or her operations and find the best, most efficient way to extract the benefits. This must be done while simultaneously not allowing the inherent complexities of these new systems to hinder or raise the cost of business processes. This is where the accumulation and deployment of applications expertise becomes immensely critical.

In fact, Skip Giessing, President of DXP Enterprises’ Rotating Equipment Division, a company that has been supplying industrial pumps since 1908, sees no reason that the demand for and importance of applications expertise won’t continue to grow in coming years.

“I believe there will be an increased demand for outstanding supplier applications expertise as suppliers and manufacturers work together to tie technology to process-equipment networking, proactive health monitoring and reliability,” he said. “The huge customer spend reduction will come when all the key equipment within a manufacturing plant is interconnected and ‘talking with one another’ and adjusting to changes, etc. Customers will need to know and understand how changes affect equipment performance and reliability and how and what to do in order to maintain maximum productivity through reliable uptime and equipment efficiency.”

So, what exactly is applications expertise? At its most basic level, it is:

  • Specialized knowledge pertaining to the use of certain products in specific conditions. This knowledge can be used to create better business outcomes and, therefore, be the foundation for gaining a competitive advantage. As the complexity of the production system increases, the value that can be unlocked from applications expertise also increases.

The graphic on the next page illustrates, the type of expert knowledge varies across the value chain, so there are ample opportunities for increased collaboration among pump manufacturers and distributors, and among distributors and end users, to strengthen expert knowledge and enhance value creation for all involved parties.

shared expertise

Tools for Managing Costs

To better understand how applications expertise can help the operator realize the importance of improving equipment productivity, efficiency and effectiveness, ExxonMobil produced a Technical Help Desk Tip that spelled out the ways to improve what it called “Overall Equipment Effectiveness,” or OEE. OEE is measured as a ratio of a plant’s actual output compared to optimal output, using the equation:

OEE = Availability x Performance x Quality, where:

  • Availability represents how frequently a machine is available for its intended use, which can be affected by equipment failure, unplanned maintenance, material shortages and changeover times
  • Performance is a measure of speed loss or the number of units a machine is rated to produce per hour versus the number of units it actually produces
  • Quality represents the amount of scrap material produced by a particular machine, with rejected materials, products that fall short of quality standards and any items that require rework all affecting overall quality.

The conclusion in the article is that the operator “can realize significant efficiency gains by calculating OEE for particular pieces of equipment throughout the plant.” Doing this will also make it easier to identify where particular pieces of equipment are operating to expected standards and norms for efficiency and reliability – and makes the operator aware of the areas where operational improvement will result in the greatest recovery of efficiency.

Another useful tool for operators is the total life-cycle cost (LCC) model for pump technologies.

Many factory managers consider only the up-front capital cost of a pumping system in their decision process, which can end up being a costly choice for their business in the long run. According to the Hydraulic Institute’s “Pump Life Cycle Costs: A Guide to LCC Analysis for Pumping Systems” manual, which it developed in conjunction with Europump, “the single most important factor in minimizing a pumping system’s LCC is proper pumping system design.” (See Sidebar: Determining Pump Life-Cycle Costs).

Other design factors that impact the pumping system’s total LCC include pipe diameters, lengths, bends, elbows, fittings and valve types, which can increase friction loss; correct sizing of the pump, wherein selecting a larger pump than necessary just “to be safe” will result in the pump operating away from the best efficiency point and requiring more energy consumption; the use of throttling valves to control flow rather than pump speed; and application requirements such as flow rate head pressure and fluid viscosity. These are all areas where applications expertise can aid the designer and installer of the system. In fact, for this reason, many manufacturers look to third-party distributors, consultants or pump manufacturers for help in system design and pump selection.

Conclusion

Industrial manufacturers may feel that they are being bombarded from all sides when they are confronted with growing demands to better confront and control energy-price volatility; meet the strict tenets of expanding regulatory-compliance legislation; and satisfy both the public and their customers who are ratcheting up expectations regarding improving environmental stewardship. While these responsibilities can be daunting, they are also a significant – and necessary – part of the cost of doing business in today’s manufacturing environment.

Manufacturers must satisfy these demands while simultaneously running a profitable business. With that in mind, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the manufacturers who will be successful in the future will be the ones who develop and utilize applications expertise, especially when selecting critical pumping technologies and systems. To do this, industrial manufacturers and their channel partners – the distributors, consultants and engineering firms that work hand-in-hand with them– are committing to building applications expertise in their industries. This expertise, when thoughtfully applied to essential system challenges, can unlock significant value for the manufacturer and the end user alike. Therefore, companies that build superior applications expertise will create a significant competitive advantage in the marketplace in the future.

Headquartered in Oakbrook Terrace, IL, USA, PSG, a Dover company, is comprised of several of the world’s leading pump brands, including Abaque™, Almatec®, Blackmer®, Ebsray®, Finder, Griswold™, EnviroGear®, Mouvex®, Neptune™, Quattroflow™, RedScrew™ and Wilden®. For more information on PSG, please visit the website: www.psgdover.com

Nate Maguire
Senior Director of Business Development PSG, U.S.A.
Tel: (909) 222-1309
E-mail: nate.maguire@psgdover.com

Ravi Prasad
Director of Sales
PSG India
Tel: 044-26271020, 26271023
E-mail: sales.psgindia@psgdover.com


Wilden® Introduces Pro-Flo® SHIFT PS220/230 FIT Metal Pumps

Grand Terrace, CA – October 2, 2017Wilden®, part of PSG®, a Dover company and a worldwide leader in air-operated double-diaphragm (AODD) pump technology, is pleased to announce the availability of its PS220/230 FIT 25 mm (1”) metal AODD pumps equipped with the energy-efficient Pro-Flo® SHIFT Air Distribution System (ADS). Available in three wetted-path materials of construction – aluminum, stainless steel and ductile iron – the new PS220/230 FIT pumps feature bolted product containment, easier maintenance and efficient operations.

PS220-and-PS230-Family-ShotProviding increased performance with no repiping necessary, Wilden FIT pumps have been designed to be direct replacements for existing Wilden clamped pumps, bolted pumps and competitive models. For simplicity of installation, direct replacement means that FIT pumps fit bolt-to-bolt and pipe-to-pipe in existing fluid-handling piping systems. This makes the Wilden FIT pump an easy, cost-effective way to enhance and upgrade existing pump performance with superior bolted product containment.

PS220/230 FIT pumps are shear sensitive and intrinsically safe with self-priming and dry-run capabilities, and offer the longest mean time between repair (MTBR), superior anti-freezing and increased on/off reliability. These pumps also feature the innovative Wilden Pro-Flo SHIFT ADS, which incorporates a unique Air Control Spool that automatically restricts the amount of air going into the pump during the latter part of each stroke, which eliminates over-filling of the air chamber and results in reduced energy consumption. By optimizing air consumption, the Pro-Flo SHIFT lowers energy and operating costs.

Wilden PS220/230 FIT pumps are available with maximum discharge pressures to 8.6 bar (125 psig), maximum flow rates to 254 lpm (56 gpm) and maximum suction lifts to 6.9 m (22.7’) dry, 9.0 m (29.5’) wet. Diaphragms are available in Buna-N, EPDM, Polyurethane, PTFE, Saniflex™, Viton® and Wil-Flex™.

For more information about Wilden, please visit wildenpump.com. Wilden is a product brand within PSG, a Dover company. For more information on PSG, please visit psgdover.com.

About Wilden Pump and Engineering:
Jim Wilden revolutionized the pumping industry when he invented the air-operated double-diaphragm (AODD) pump in 1955. Since then, Wilden AODD pumps have proven to be trustworthy solutions to pumping applications in a wide variety of industries. Wilden pumps are part of PSG®, a Dover company, and manufactured in Grand Terrace, CA.

Marketing Contact:
Christine Anderson, Marketing Communications Manager
PSG®
909-422-1774 or Christine.Anderson@psgdover.com

Media Contact:
Darren Wight, VP Media & Publicity
DeanHouston (agency for PSG®)
513-280-0047 or dwight@deanhouston.com


Wilden® P420/430 and P820/830 FIT Metal Pumps Now Available

Grand Terrace, CA – October 2, 2017Wilden®, part of PSG®, a Dover company and a worldwide leader in air-operated double-diaphragm (AODD) pump technology, is pleased to announce the availability of its P420/430 FIT 38 mm (1-1/2”) and P820/830 FIT 51 mm (2”) AODD pumps equipped with the Pro-Flo® Air Distribution System (ADS). Available in three wetted-path materials of construction – aluminum, stainless steel and ductile iron – the new P420/430 and P820/830 FIT pumps feature bolted product containment, easier maintenance and efficient operations.

P420-P820-Family-ShotProviding increased performance with no repiping necessary, Wilden FIT pumps have been designed to be direct replacements for existing Wilden clamped pumps, bolted pumps and competitive models. For simplicity of installation, direct replacement means that FIT pumps fit bolt-to-bolt and pipe-to-pipe in existing fluid-handling piping systems. This makes the Wilden FIT pump an easy, cost-effective way to enhance and upgrade existing pump performance with superior bolted product containment.

The bolted configuration of the P420/430 and P820/830 ensures total product containment while the redesigned liquid path reduces internal friction to maximize output and efficiency. Wilden P420/430 and P820/830 FIT pumps offer the longest mean time between repair (MTBR), superior anti-freezing and increased on/off reliability. These pumps are also shear sensitive and intrinsically safe with self-priming and dry-run capabilities.

Wilden P420/430 and P820/830 FIT pumps feature maximum discharge pressures to 8.6 bar (125 psig), and the maximum flow rate on the P420/430 is 492 lpm (130 gpm) while the maximum flow rate on the P820/830 is 609 lpm (161 gpm). Diaphragms are available in Buna-N, EPDM, Polyurethane, PTFE, Saniflex™, Viton® and Wil-Flex™.

For more information about Wilden, please visit wildenpump.com. Wilden is a product brand within PSG, a Dover company. For more information on PSG, please visit psgdover.com.

About Wilden Pump and Engineering:
Jim Wilden revolutionized the pumping industry when he invented the air-operated double-diaphragm (AODD) pump in 1955. Since then, Wilden AODD pumps have proven to be trustworthy solutions to pumping applications in a wide variety of industries. Wilden pumps are part of PSG®, a Dover company, and manufactured in Grand Terrace, CA.

Marketing Contact:
Christine Anderson, Marketing Communications Manager
PSG®
909-422-1774 or Christine.Anderson@psgdover.com

Media Contact:
Darren Wight, VP Media & Publicity
DeanHouston (agency for PSG®)
513-280-0047 or dwight@deanhouston.com


AODD Pumps a First Choice for Chemical Processors (Part 2 of 2)

Source: Modern Pumping Today

Advancements in overall efficiency combine with a variety of handling capabilities

There’s no question that the improvements in overall AODD pump operation and ADS capabilities have been significant over the years, and the same can be said for diaphragm materials and design. As AODD pumps have begun to be used in more process-type applications the advances in diaphragm performance have kept pace.

DISCUSSING DIAPHRAGMS

Correct diaphragm material selection is critical to ensure safe AODD pump operation, with six primary factors to consider when choosing a diaphragm: chemical compatibility, temperature range, abrasion resistance, flex life, performance, and cost. To help meet these diverse operational criteria, the number of effective diaphragm materials has also grown and now consists of three basic subsets: Synthetic rubber

(Neoprene, Buna-N, EPDM, and Viton®), thermoplastic elastomers (TPE) (polyurethane, Santoprene®, Hytrel®, and Geolast®), and Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon®). Manufacturers have experts on hand to help pump users select the best diaphragm material and design for their applications.

Click here to read the full story.


The Value of Applications Knowledge

Source: World Pumps

Industrial producers, such as paint and resin manufacturers or oil-and-gas refinery operators, are investing in advanced technologies that will help them to achieve their business goals. Smart SCADA systems can reduce downtime through proactive monitoring. Energy-efficient pump technology delivers operating-cost savings, hedges against energy-price fluctuations and helps companies to meet their environmental stewardship goals by reducing carbon emissions.

However, any new technology can dramatically increase the complexity of business operations, at a time when cost pressures and economic headwinds threaten to curtail growth and profitability. Further, these technology investments require specialized knowledge and expertise to build, operate, and maintain. Many industrial producers, like most businesses, face resource constraints and are operating with leaner staffing levels than ever before. As a result, they are finding that they don’t possess the in-house expertise to effectively select, build, operate and maintain increasingly complex equipment and systems, and often are forced to turn to third-party organizations with specialized knowledge, for support.

Pump manufacturers in particular, along with their related distributors, engineering firms, consultants and other third parties, are increasingly stepping up to supply this critical applications expertise to their end-user customers. Properly deployed applications expertise can unlock value for industrial producers, and organizations that build superior applications expertise in their markets can gain a significant competitive advantage.

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Wilden Original Series Air-Operated Double-Diaphragm (AODD) Pumps in operation at a ceramic plant in Spain.

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A stainless-steel Wilden Advanced PX Series AODD Pump in use at the SABA B.V. glue- and adhesive-manufacturing facility in the Netherlands.

 

The challenge

Industrial manufacturers are facing an increasingly difficult business environment, one that is often impacted by these and other critical factors:

• Energy-price volatility.

• Regulatory compliance legislation and associated costs.

• Public/customer expectations for enhanced resource stewardship.

Energy-price volatility

Price volatility is defined in the energy industry as how quickly or widely electricity and/or natural gas prices change over a given time period. Prices are governed by supply and demand, where demand is impacted by factors such as weather patterns, economic conditions and consumer behaviour. In recent years, price volatility has increased in the energy market. To protect against this volatility, many companies 'hedge,' or buy a commodity at a price that is locked in over a set period of time. While this may improve peace of mind for the operator, hedging is costly and doesn’t create value for the operator beyond reducing energy-cost volatility.

The severity, and potential impact of price volatility is such that in its 2015 report titled, 'The New Normal,' the World Energy Council (WEC) opined that, “The uncertain impact of volatile energy and commodity prices…has now established itself as the number-one issue for energy leaders worldwide.” The good news is that global energy leaders have recognized this challenge and are beginning to take measures to address it. According to Francois Moisan in WEC’s triennial 2016 report, 'Energy Efficiency: A straight path towards energy sustainability,' “The introduction of energy-efficiency policies and measures has been growing fast around the world. The increasing number of countries with an energy-efficiency law…signifies a strengthening and consolidation of the industrial commitment to energy efficiency.”

The report does also indicate, however, that “despite the significant advances, much more can and should be done to improve the efficiency of energy production and use.” This is extremely noteworthy for industrial manufacturers because, as the WEC also notes, “industrial electric motors and electric motor-driven systems consume almost half of the total electricity and account for 70% of the total (amount of) electricity consumed in the industry.” For many industrial companies, where energy is a significant portion of operating costs, price volatility will continue to be a challenge. These companies will be self-served to evaluate energy-saving technology, but will only reap the greatest rewards if they do so by taking into account the intricacies of their equipment in the specific applications in which they operate. Only by developing and using the proper applications expertise will they be able to identify and choose the technology that is best suited to mitigate the cost risks associated with energy volatility.

Regulatory compliance

Regulatory compliance is by definition a necessity for businesses in the modern world. These laws collectively shape the environment in which businesses operate. The number of federal regulations in the U.S. has been growing steadily for several decades, requiring investments by many businesses in order to maintain compliance. In fact, a study by George Mason University shows that “the effects of federal regulation on value added to the (U.S.) GDP for a panel of 22 industries…over a period of 35 years…dampened (GDP by approximately) 0.8% per year since 1980, eliminating $4 trillion in growth by 2012.”

Two prominent examples in the industrial-manufacturing universe are the motor-efficiency regulations that have been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) in Europe. The bottom line is that regulations are an unavoidable requirement for doing business in almost any jurisdiction in the world. Advances in technology that have been geared towards meeting the demands of a stricter regulatory environment will help industrial producers to navigate the compliance realm, but will be optimized only if they are applied with the appropriate applications expertise. In fact, the misapplication of a pump (e.g., incorrectly sizing the pump for its job) will likely lead to far greater energy consumption than can be saved from improvements in motor technology.

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A Mouvex SLS Series Eccentric Disc Pump being used to transfer carbonated-beverage bases by the Coca-Cola Hellenic Bottling Company.

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A Griswold 811 Series Centrifugal Pump in action during a Leased Asset Custody Transfer (LACT) operation in the Eagle Ford shale play in Texas.

Expectations for resource stewardship

A phrase that has gained in stature over the past two decades in all forms of business is 'corporate social responsibility,' or CSR, which is commonly characterized as “business practices involving initiatives that benefit society.” An article in the June 18, 2016, issue of the International Journal of Business and Management titled, 'Corporate Social Responsibility and Consumer Buying Behavior in Emerging Markets,' highlighted that “consumers now want companies to behave ethically in addition to providing quality product[s]...”

The obvious implication is that those companies that are perceived to be inattentive or irresponsible stewards regarding shared resources, for example, community water supplies, risk a political and social backlash that could impact the company’s standing and ability to do business in the communities in which it operates. Therefore, it shouldn’t be surprising that a report from Harvard Business School titled, “The Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility on Investment Recommendations,” revealed that “recent research shows spending money on corporate social responsibility is no longer seen as a detriment to a company’s profitability.

Stock analysts now view such expenditures as essential to a company’s long-term brand and value.” In short, to improve their CSR standing, more and more companies are investing additional time and resources toward incorporating new technologies, changing operating practices and even adjusting business strategies in order to better assuage the corporate-responsibility demands of the buying public. Indeed, these resources can only be optimized by developing and applying expert knowledge of the business, its systems and the local environment in which it operates. Businesses that develop and use this knowledge will help satisfy the needs of the public while achieving positive outcomes in resource stewardship.

The solution

So how do industrial manufacturers address the challenges of price volatility, regulatory compliance and resource stewardship, and still successfully achieve their business goals? Many companies are turning to technology for assistance. In a February 2013 article titled, 'The Dawn of the Smart Factory,' IndustryWeek magazine detailed a looming manufacturing nirvana known as the 'Smart Factory.' This factory of the future will be “a paradise of efficiency where defect and downtime, waste and waiting are long-forgotten issues of a long-forgotten age.” The driving force behind this phenomenon would be plant managers and chief intelligence officers who work together to create a seamless blend of data and production that will “illuminate every turn of every machine, every cut of every blade, every move of every piece in its global dance to deliver.”

While the hyperbole in this article is heavy, the article’s basic premise was echoed in a 2015 study by Marketsand-Markets, a publisher of premium market-research reports. In its piece titled, 'Smart Factory Market by Technology, Component, Industry, and Geography – Global Forecast to 2022,' Markets and-Markets researchers found that the smart-factory market, in terms of value, is expected to reach $74.8 billion by 2022, with a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 10.4% between 2016 and 2022.

“The emergence of smart factories can be seen from the period of change toward cohesive control of the machineries, processes, and resources with local intelligence,” read the report. “The increasing focus on saving energy and improving process efficiency, along with the integration of engineering and manufacturing by the adoption of IoT (the ‘Internet of Things’) is expected to foster the growth of the smart-factory market.” While the smart-factory operating principles promise to be a boon for industrial manufacturers who implement them, they will raise the complexity of the operation, which poses its own set of unique challenges. In fact, according to strategic-management consulting firm A.T. Kearney’s 'How Much Does Complexity Really Cost?' survey of the top 30 companies in Germany, a reduction in operational complexity would boost earnings by more than €30 billion and increase earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT) by 3% to 5%.

The ultimate challenge for a manufacturer is to learn how new technologies can improve his or her operations and find the best, most efficient way to extract the benefits. This must be done while simultaneously not allowing the inherent complexities of these new systems to hinder or raise the cost of business processes. This is where the accumulation and deployment of applications expertise becomes immensely critical. In fact, Skip Giessing, President of DXP Enterprises’ Rotating Equipment Division, a company that has been supplying industrial pumps since 1908, sees no reason that the demand for and importance of applications expertise won’t continue to grow in coming years.

“I believe there will be an increased demand for outstanding supplier applications expertise as suppliers and manufacturers work together to tie technology to process-equipment networking, proactive health monitoring and reliability,” he said. “The huge customer spend reduction will come when all the key equipment within a manufacturing plant is interconnected and ‘talking with one another’ and adjusting to changes, etc. Customers will need to know and understand how changes affect equipment performance and reliability and how and what to do in order to maintain maximum productivity through reliable uptime and equipment efficiency.” So, what exactly is applications expertise? At its most basic level, it is specialized knowledge pertaining to the use of certain products in specific conditions. This knowledge can be used to create better business outcomes and, therefore, be the foundation for gaining a competitive advantage. As the complexity of the production system increases, the value that can be unlocked from applications expertise also increases. As the graphic illustrates (see Figure 1), the type of expert knowledge varies across the value chain, so there are ample opportunities for increased collaboration among pump manufacturers and distributors, and among distributors and end users, to strengthen expert knowledge and enhance value creation for all involved parties.

chart

Figure 1: Collaboration is key across the value chain.

Tools for managing costs

To better understand how applications expertise can help the operator realize the importance of improving equipment productivity, efficiency and effectiveness, ExxonMobil produced a Technical Help Desk Tip that spelled out the ways to improve what it called “Overall Equipment Effectiveness,” or OEE. OEE is measured as a ratio of a plant’s actual output compared to optimal output, using the equation: OEE = Availability x Performance x Quality, where:

• Availability represents how frequently a machine is available for its intended use, which can be affected by equipment failure, unplanned maintenance, material shortages and changeover times.

• Performance is a measure of speed loss, or the number of units a machine is rated to produce per hour versus the number of units it actually produces.

• Quality represents the amount of scrap material produced by a particular machine, with rejected materials, products that fall short of quality standards and any items that require rework all affecting overall quality.

The conclusion is that the operator “can realize significant efficiency gains by calculating OEE for particular pieces of equipment throughout the plant.” Doing this will also make it easier to identify where particular pieces of equipment are operating to expected standards and norms for efficiency and reliability, and makes the operator aware of the areas where operational improvement will result in the greatest recovery of efficiency.

Another useful tool for operators is the total life-cycle cost (LCC) model for pump technologies. Many factory managers consider only the upfront capital cost of a pumping system in their decision process, which can end up being a costly choice for their business in the long run. According to the Hydraulic Institute’s 'Pump Life Cycle Costs: A Guide to LCC Analysis for Pumping Systems' manual, which it developed in conjunction with Europump, “the single most important factor in minimizing a pumping system’s LCC is proper pumping system design.” Other design factors that impact the pumping system’s total LCC include pipe diameters, lengths, bends, elbows, fittings and valve types, which can increase friction loss. These factors include the correct sizing of the pump, as selecting a larger pump than necessary just ‘to be safe’ will result in the pump operating away from the best efficiency point and requiring more energy consumption; the use of throttling valves to control flow rather than pump speed; and application requirements such as flow rate head pressure and fluid viscosity. These are all areas where applications expertise can aid the designer and installer of the system. In fact, for this reason, many manufacturers look to third-party distributors, consultants or pump manufacturers for help in system design and pump selection.

Conclusion

Industrial manufacturers may feel that they are being bombarded when they are confronted with growing demands to confront and control energy-price volatility, meet the strict requirements of expanding regulatory-compliance legislation, and satisfy both the public and their customers who are ratcheting up expectations regarding improving environmental stewardship. While this can be daunting, it is also a significant, and necessary part of the cost of doing business in today’s manufacturing environment. Manufacturers must satisfy these demands while simultaneously running a profitable business. With that in mind, it’s becoming increasingly apparent that the manufacturers who will be successful in the future will be the ones who develop and utilize applications expertise, especially when selecting critical pumping technologies and systems.

To do this, industrial manufacturers and their channel partners (the distributors, consultants and engineering firms that work hand-in-hand with them) are committing to building applications expertise in their industries. This expertise, when thoughtfully applied to essential system challenges, can unlock significant value for the manufacturer and the end user alike. Therefore, companies that build superior applications expertise will create a significant competitive advantage in the market in the future.

www.wildenpump.com

www.psgdover.com

 

 


AODD Pumps a First Choice for Chemical Processors (Part 1 of 2)

Source: Modern Pumping Today

The circumstances that prompted Jim Wilden to develop the air-operated double-diaphragm (AODD) pumping principle six decades ago have taken on almost mythic status: a ruptured water pipe, a flooded workshop, and an exclamation from a coworker that “Slim” (Wilden’s nickname) could “make a million dollars” if he could invent a solution.

In the ensuing sixty-plus years, those words have proven to be prophetic as the AODD pump technology that was said to be “conceived out of necessity, born in the arms of innovation, and inspired by sheer will and determination” has become a go-to choice for operators in rough-and-tumble industries like mining and heavy construction who require a pump that can easily and reliably pump water, slurry, or any finely divided substance, such as cement, in diverse operating environments.

Click here to read the full story.


Wilden® Releases PS1 13 mm (½”) Original™ Clamped Metal Pump

PS1-AL-ClampedGrand Terrace, CA – August 31, 2017Wilden®, part of PSG®, a Dover company and a worldwide leader in air-operated double-diaphragm (AODD) pump technology, is pleased to announce the availability of its PS1 Original™ 13 mm (½”) clamped metal AODD pump equipped with the energy-efficient Pro-Flo® SHIFT Air Distribution System (ADS). This new high performance pump features the reliability and energy savings of the Pro-Flo SHIFT ADS while its clamped configuration allows for easier maintenance, diaphragm replacement and cleaning.

The Wilden Pro-Flo SHIFT ADS incorporates a unique Air Control Spool that automatically restricts the amount of air going into the pump during the latter part of each stroke, which eliminates over-filling of the air chamber and results in reduced energy consumption. By optimizing air consumption, the Pro-Flo SHIFT lowers energy and operating costs.

The footprint of the PS1 Original matches that of the Wilden PX1 Original, which enables direct replacement of a PX1 Original with no repiping necessary. With less components (no dial) and 7% more efficient than the PX1 Original, the backward capability of the PS1 Original makes it an easy, cost-effective way to enhance and upgrade existing pump performance. PS1 Original pumps are shear sensitive and intrinsically safe with self-priming and dry-run capabilities, and offer the longest mean time between repair (MTBR), superior anti-freezing and increased on/off reliability.

The Wilden PS1 Original has an aluminum center block and is available with an aluminum, stainless steel or alloy C wetted-path material. Meeting CE and ATEX requirements, the pump features maximum discharge pressures to 8.6 bar (125 psig), maximum flow rates to 60.2 lpm (15.9 gpm), and maximum suction lifts to 5.9 m (19.3’) dry and 9.8 m (32.2’) wet. Diaphragms are available in Buna-N, EPDM, Polyurethane, PTFE, Saniflex™, Viton® and Wil-Flex™. Additionally, PS1 Original pumps will be available for compliance with FDA CFR 21.177 and 1935/2004/EC standards.

For more information about Wilden, please visit wildenpump.com. Wilden is a product brand within PSG, a Dover company. For more information on PSG, please visit psgdover.com.

About Wilden Pump and Engineering:
Jim Wilden revolutionized the pumping industry when he invented the air-operated double-diaphragm (AODD) pump in 1955. Since then, Wilden AODD pumps have proven to be trustworthy solutions to pumping applications in a wide variety of industries. Wilden pumps are part of PSG®, a Dover company, and manufactured in Grand Terrace, CA.

Marketing Contact:
Christine Anderson, Marketing Communications Manager
PSG®
909-422-1774 or Christine.Anderson@psgdover.com

Media Contact:
Darren Wight, VP Media & Publicity
DeanHouston (agency for PSG®)
513-280-0047 or dwight@deanhouston.com


Mastering the Art of Paint Production

Source: Paint & Coatings Industry

As it turns out, there is a definite ‘art’ to the manufacture of the arts and crafts paints that enables a child to finger paint a family portrait worthy of a place on the fridge door. One company that has moved to the head of the class in the production of school and hobby paints is Dutch company Havo.

Jaap Vos founded Havo in 1963 as a manufacturer of modelling materials for use in schools in the region. In the ensuing 53 years, Havo has grown to be a leading name in the production of creative materials – paints, clay, glues, drawing materials and other related accessories – for use in the educational and retail hobby market segments.

Today, Havo’s Creall paint brand is used by schools and hobby enthusiasts in 53 countries all over the world, with further expansion into the global retail marketplace ongoing.

“We do create a lot of products, and in paints we produce 4 million litres a year,” explains Jan Zwiers, managing director for Havo. “It’s very important that we have products that have good quality and reliability, so the equipment we use to make our products needs to be efficient and effective.”

Zwiers’ commitment to only producing creative products of the highest quality not only reflects well on the Havo name, but also helps ensure domestic tranquility because he is married to Annemieke Zwiers-Vos, who is also a managing director for the company and the daughter of Havo founder Jaap Vos.

Havo, producer of creative materials for use in the educational and retail hobby markets, was recommended to use Wilden’s Original and Advanced AODD pumps by pump distributor Holland Air Pumps

Searching for the perfect pump

Seeing hobby paints dispensed from a squeeze tube or bottle gives the impression that they must be easy to manufacture. In reality, though, there are many strict mixing, blending and transferring stages that must be successfully completed for every batch to guarantee that every colour, whether primary, secondary or tertiary, has the tint and look that is expected.

“Our products look ordinary and easy to handle, but at times it’s hard to produce or pump the paints because they can be hard to manage,” says Zwiers. “Because we are in a niche market, the machines we use to produce our paints may need to be modified to make them right for our purposes. That’s why we have high demands for our machines, and that’s why we need good machines.”

The man charged with the task of ensuring that every drop of Creall paint that leaves the manufacturing plant meets Havo’s high quality standards is technical manager Job Doppenberg.

“We work from 8am to 4.30pm every day, and if it’s busy, the plant keeps going until 9pm,” says Doppenberg. “My job is to guarantee that all the machines are running, and if they are not running well, I look for the solution.”

Keeping equipment running properly is often easier said than done because the raw materials that are used to produce Havo’s paints can have a long list of unique handling characteristics. This can be especially true at high-volume production rates, with Havo producing a total of 3.5 million tubes and bottles of paint annually, or nearly 10,000 a day.

“We pump the paint to one big tank, mix it with pigment, then fill the bottles that go to schools or retail outlets,” Doppenberg continues. “The paints we produce are abrasive, have high viscosity and can be a little bit sticky, with some paints more sticky than others. The viscosity of our paint is also very high, up to 30,000 kilopascals (kPa), which can have more handling problems than paint with a viscosity of 20,000 kPa. So, if we have a pump problem then the different lines can’t be filled and production stops.”

Over the years, Doppenberg and Havo had tried different pump technologies, most recently gear pumps, for the hypercritical blending, mixing and bottle-filling operations, but had begun to notice shortcomings in their operational ability that were hampering the production schedules.

“We have tried a lot of different pump technologies to pump our paint, pumps with seals, and very high-priced, expensive pumps, like gear pumps,” recalls Doppenberg. “We had a gear pump running for one year and it needed to be repaired, and it never pumped good again. We also had a piston pump on our high-pressure filter press that is used for cleaning the machines and it was breaking down. So, what do you do then? We started to look for another pump.”

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Creall paint is used by schools and hobby enthusiasts in more than 53 countries worldwide

Solving the problem with air

To help with the problem, Doppenberg turned to Holland Air Pumps of Oirschot in the Netherlands, a distributor of air-powered pumps, and asked Gerrit Klaassen, Holland Air Pumps’ commercial director, if he could recommend any alternatives.

“We’ve been working with Holland Air Pumps for 15 to 16 years because the service is good. They have parts in stock and, if there is a problem, the people from Holland Air Pumps come here and explain what the solution is,” says Doppenberg.

“They also supply test pumps to show what the solution is, so I talked to Gerrit and he said we could test some air pumps that they had.”

Klaassen recommended Wilden air-operated double-diaphragm (AODD) pumps, a product brand of US company PSG, for which Holland Air Pumps is a distributor in the Netherlands and other European countries.

In particular, Klaassen suggested stainless-steel Wilden Original (clamped) and Advanced (bolted) AODD pumps, the 51mm PS8 and PS800 models, respectively.

“Since the viscosity of our paints is very high we needed AODD pumps with stainless-steel balls so that the ball would not get stuck in the paint when it was time to reseat in the valve,” explains Doppenberg.

“If the ball gets stuck in the paint, it stays up and the pump won’t pump. With the stainless-steel Wilden pumps, the balls have time to drop through the paint and reseat after pumping. It’s a nice pump, a very good pump.”

In addition to having the ability to handle high-viscosity liquids, the PS8 and PS800 pumps have a redesigned liquid path that reduces internal friction for maximised flow rates and pumping efficiency with leak-free product containment guaranteed.

Diaphragm options include Buna-N, EPDM, Geolast, Neoprene, polyurethane, PTFE (Teflon), Saniflex (Hytrel), Viton and Wil-Flex (Santoprene).

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The production of hobby paints includes strict mixing, blending and transferring stages pressure

Additionally, the PS8 and PS800 pumps are fitted with Wilden’s revolutionary Pro-Flo SHIFT Air Distribution System (ADS). The design and operation of the Pro-Flo SHIFT provides up to 60% savings in air consumption when compared to competitive models, achieving lower operating costs and carbon footprint. This was another crucial consideration for Havo, which prides itself on being a ‘green’ company and powers its facility with solar energy while constantly monitoring electricity consumption.

Havo employs a total of 25 Wilden pumps in its production operation, all equipped with Wilden Equalizer SD series surge dampeners. This accessory minimises unwanted pressure fluctuations during liquid-transfer applications by providing a supplementary pumping action that virtually eliminates pressure variations that can create pulse in the liquid flow, with operational capability up to 8.6 bar (125 psi).

The SD series is available in aluminum, stainless steel, cast iron and polypropylene, depending on the pump model being used, and is also compatible with all of Wilden’s standard diaphragm options.

In the filter press that is used to clean the wastewater before it moves to the treatment plant, Havo is utilising an Advanced H800 high pressure AODD pump. The bolted configuration of the 51mm pump ensures total product containment with stainless steel and cast iron available for the wetted path, which has been redesigned to maximise output and efficiency. Diaphragm options include PTFE and Wil-Flex.

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Original and Advanced AODD pumps are ideal for Havo because they can handle high-viscosity liquids

“When a long-time partner like Havo comes to us with a problem, we do our best to identify and recommend the right solution,” says Klaassen. “When Job approached me with the challenge he was facing in pumping highly viscous and sticky paint products, I knew the Wilden pumps would be the best solution.”

Pumps make life easier

By their nature, artists are perfectionists, and they feel that every painting is truly a work of art. That means that the companies that produce the paints they use must also strive to provide perfect products. Havo has been able to meet that standard for more than 50 years in part by partnering with equipment suppliers that recognise its unique production needs and are able to deliver the ideal solution.

“I need machines that I can trust to do the job, and we need partners that I can trust, that if I call them they can tell me what to do, and I get that from Holland Air Pumps,” says Doppenberg. “The Wilden pumps are very good at helping me do my job, and they make my job easier.”

www.wildenpump.com